Wednesday, 24 August 2016

Wednesday Postcard - Monet's House and Garden at Giverney


As Spring approaches in the Southern Hemisphere my memories flood back to an April day and a visit
to Claude Monet's house and garden at Giverney. A visit to this garden had been on my wish list for many
years and when the chance to visit became a reality ,I was as excited as a schoolgirl.


Tulips just happen to be my favourite Spring flower and the variety of colours and shapes was just spectacular. I often think of creating a garden as painting with flowers instead of paints and the planting combinations were art itself.



The tulips were the stars of the show with underplantings of pansies , forget-me-nots , hyacinth and wallflowers. The shape and colour of this one really got my attention.


The famous water garden with its Japanese inspired green bridge.You can glimpse the water lily pads , though not the right season for flowers, but what a sight they must be in full bloom.


I am rather fond of blue and white china and these pots with their cheery blooms, wallflowers if my
memory serves me right, on the front verandah caught my eye. They contrast so well against the
pink and greens of the house.






This is the drawing room studio , recreated just as it was in Monet's time. The art works on display here
are reproductions of originals that now hang in the Musee Marmotton-Monet and the Musee d"orsay
and as well as galleries and museums throughout the world.

 
A feature of the kitchen is its blue and white ceramic tiles from Rouen.


I hope you have enjoyed my little tour of Monet's house and garden. I do wish I lived closer so I could
see the garden in Summer with the roses and irises in full blooms or maybe in Autumn colour. Oh well a
girl can dream can't she.But if you love tulips visit in Spring.

Monday, 22 August 2016

Black and Cream - Winter's Light and Shade


Black and cream have been a combination I have enjoyed wearing for many a Winter.I always think
of them as  providing the elements of light and shade , sometimes hard to find at this time of year.


Playing in my closet often uncovers little surprises , the fluffy scarf and beret , that have remained
hidden for a while.I had forgotten how much I loved wearing them both as they are warm and cosy.
I am a big fan of shopping my closet , you never know what will emerge from the depths. So often
something that had fallen out of favour can be restyled or worn differently and hey presto new again.


Both my Moyuru black dress and the cream ruffled jacket have appeared on the blog previously, although
not together. They both reflect my own philosophy on only buying what I love and will wear for many
seasons to come. These days I buy very little retail as I find so much of the quality poor and I am
troubled by the concept of fast fashion and the way these items are produced.
I keep my eye out at our two local recycling stores for any treasures, sometimes you can be lucky.


Joining Patti for Visible Monday
and
Jess for Turning Heads Tuesday

Wednesday, 17 August 2016

Postcard Wednesday - Fascinating Cordoba, Spain


Cordoba in the Andalusia region of Southern Spain is a fascinating place to visit , full of charm and a surprise
around every corner. The city has a rich history dating back to Roman times.





This is the courtyard of our charming hotel, El Palacio del Corregidor, in the old Jewish quarter. Walking along the cobbled streets , too narrow for cars , you get the feeling of times gone by as you loose yourself in
the history of the area.


The Roman Bridge, spanning the Guadalquivir River was built in the early 1st. century and was quite a
sight in the evening light.





 

The Mezquita, Cordoba's Great Mosque , dating back 12 centuries, is regarded as one of the most
accomplished monuments of Moorish architecture.The site was originally a small temple of Christian
origin, The Catholic Basilica of Saint Vincent of Lerins. When Muslims conquered Spain in 711 the church
was first divided into Muslim and Christian halves. This sharing lasted until 784 when the Christian half was
purchased by Emir Abd-al-Rahman, who demolished the original structure and built the Grand Mosque.
Cordoba returned to Christian rule in 1236 and the building was converted to a Roman Catholic church.

The building is most notable for its large open area with 856 columns of jasper, onyx ,marble and onyx,
a sight to behold.

Cordoba was a fascinating city with a wealth of treasures and I hope one day to return.

Monday, 15 August 2016

The Small Things


The small things in life are what really brings so much joy each and every day. The things that so often are
overlooked in our busy world , the change in the light as seasons come and go, the birdsong in the morning,
the greening of trees as Spring approaches and the joy of early Spring flowers, are natures gifts to be
savoured. I was reminded by a friend how lucky we are to live in an area that experiences all four seasons.


Spring is now officially two weeks away , so to celebrate I choose to wear this light weight wool jacket ,
from Perri Cutten . Yellow is a colour that I enjoy wearing , it really does induce a sunny outlook to my day.
Maybe with Spring around the corner I will keep my eye out for more yellow or other citrus tones to add
to my Spring and Summer wardrobe.


Amongst the blue green of the new growth of the eucalyptus tree in my Ted Baker hat . Hat wearing is for
me is one of life's joys and my collection is ever expanding as hats continue to call my name.


Today's outfit started with these black and yellow fingerless gloves that I purchased in Paris from a charming
little glove shop , named Acuba , that was just near our apartment. I must admit to returning several times
and coming home with several pairs for me and a pretty pair for my daughter-in-law.


Finishing today's post with a couple of images taken in my garden. The hellebore above so reminds me of
fairy skirts with all its different layers.


Hoping everyone is enjoying the best of the small things in life.

Joining Jess for Turning Heads Tuesday
and
Sydney Fashion Hunter

Wednesday, 10 August 2016

Postcard Wednesday - Fashion Forward Three Centuries of Fashion


Fashion Forward- 3 Centuries of Fashion Exhibition at the Museum of Decorative Arts in Paris was
for this lover of all things fashion an absolute joy. The exhibition showcased 300 items from the museum's
collection dating from the late 1700's to today. The moment I spied the posters in the street I knew this
was a must see for me , which I did, twice in fact and it surely did not disappoint.


The richness and exquisite textiles in the historical garments tell their own story and I couldn't help
but fantasize about  who may have worn them and the lives they had at that time.






These little beauties are dolls used by designers , aren't they wonderful , perfect in every detail and
those hats.



The colours in this coat from the 1930's grabbed my attention. If my memory serves me correctly it
was from the French Couture designer , Jeanne-Marie Lanvin.


The New Look by Christian Dior was launched in 1947 and featured a jacket with rounded shoulders,
cinched waist and very full skirts. The popularity of this look by Dior helped reestablish the French Fashion
Industry after the harsh years of WW2.


The swinging sixties with a pants suit by Andre Courreges from 1965 and a selection of shorter skirts and
cropped double breasted jackets and of course the shift dress.



Some stunningly beautiful evening wear from many designers and eras , just breathtaking.


This last little number has to be my favourite from the modern era.It is by Japanese designer, Yohji Yamamoto, from his Autumn/Winter collection 2003/2004 and is wool houndstooth with a black chiffon
overlay.

I hope you have enjoyed a small peak at this exhibition through my eyes.













Monday, 8 August 2016

Black , Some Touches of Red and a New Perspective


The outfit I had planned to wear for today's post was very different to this one but as often happens ,to me at least, it didn't feel right so here I am back in my always feels right black, with added touches of red.


A side benefit of blogging is scouting out new areas of my small city that make good backdrops for
photography.Today was one of those days when things didn't quite go as planned , the wall behind
me that I have used on previous occasions was covered with some most imaginative street art
or graffiti (depending on your perspective) but in their wisdom our local council has painted over
or removed them and returned it to its dreary grey state.


These few shots were taken in area that used to house the Gas Works , I am rather fond of its
worn patina but that will soon disappear as the area is to be redeveloped in the near future.


A rusty wheel was a great place to show my red suede boots from Ara and a peek at my bangles.


 I would like to thank everyone for their kind and helpful comments on my last post about the
challenges of retirement, it has helped give me a new perspective on embracing the changes.
One thing I wish to explore is dressing as an art form and seeing where that path leads, it should
be fun,  maybe so much more colour in the future. I also plan to turn a no longer used bedroom
into my office/ playroom (dressingroom), one advantage of your children leaving home.
Blogging friends really are the best, thank you all.


Joining Patti for Visible Monday
Jess for Turning Heads Tuesday

Wednesday, 3 August 2016

Postcard Wednesday - The Joys of Barcelona


Barcelona in the Catalan region of Spain had been on my revisit list since a brief stop there way back in
1975 and it surely lived up to my expectations, with surprises around every corner. This Art Deco dragon
in Placa de la Boqueria was designed for a former umbrella shop.


The mix of architecture, each with its own stand out features , is always a great fascination for me, so my
camera was kept busy .


The carved details on this building in an area of the Old Town , Barri Gotic , were just quite something.
The Old Town is traversed by the historical Las Ramblas , a wide tree lined walkway that is thronging
with people day or night . The Barri Gotic area is a wonderful maze of streets and alleyways.



The works of architect Antoni Gaudi dominate the city's psyche as well as its skyline.Antoni Gaudi i Cornet
was born in Reuss into a family of artisans. Gaudi was a leading exponent of Catalan Modernism and his works evoke many elements .The extravagant church of the Sagrada Familia is surely one of his most recognised works. The church is an ongoing work,with a probable finish date in 2026, I do hope I am able
to see the completed church.


The interior is an amazing work of art with its sculptural lines and stained glass.


The carvings above the outside  entrance speak for themselves.



This is another of Gaudi's works, Casa Batllo, built between 1904-1906, its facade has heavily tiled walls
and curving iron balconies.



The interior showcases the use of both timber and tiles . I was most taken by the rounded door and window frames, the craftmanship is quite something.


The Parc Guell was originally concieved as a housing project (but never reached fruition) . The project was built between 1900 and 1914 and the park was opened in 1926. It is one Gaudi's most colourful works with
symbolism drawing from nature and mythology.







I hope you have enjoyed a small peak at Barcelona through my eyes.I do hope to return some day as
there is still so much more of this city I still haven't explored.Also maybe next time the rain will stay away.